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Presentation: Experiences in implementing Triple S method in Uganda: Emerging issues and implications to seed systems research

Planting sweetpotato at the on-set of first rains implies early harvests of roots to fill the gap of food shortage created during the long dry period. Unfortunately, early planting is compromised by planting material as farmers have to wait for sprouts from previous fields. The Storage in Sand and Sprouting (Triple ‘S) is a roots-to-vines method in irrigated root-beds for early planting. Demonstrations of the method using Ejumula, Kabode and Kakamega varieties were conducted in four districts in northern Uganda besides sensitizing and training the selected farmers and extensions workers for four seasons in two years. The aims of the demonstrations were to allow farmers appreciate the method and transfer it at scale. Numbers of 30 cm long vines per root were collected at first on-set of rains and then 45 days later. The method significantly (P<0.001) generated more vines with 100 seed roots producing an average of 6,366 vines valued at about US$ 20 or 0.25 Ha planted during initial rains and almost no vines collected from previous crop fields. Triple S cadres adopted the method. 

Authors: Namanda Sam, Robert Mwanga, Gerald kyalo, Jan W. Low, Mukose C, Ssemakula G, Namanda Sam, Robert Mwanga, Gerald kyalo, Jan W. Low, Mukose C, Ssemakula G

Contributors: Sam Namanda, Sam Namanda

Subjects: Conservation

Pages: 22

Publisher: International Potato Center

Publication Date: October 1, 2015

Keywords: Early yield, Triple S

HOW TO CITE

Namanda, S., Mwanga, R., Kyalo, G., Low, J., Musoke, C., Ball, A., Magezi, S. and Biryabaho, S. 2015. Experiences in implementing Triple S method in Uganda: Emerging issues and implications to seed systems research. International Potato center (CIP), Uganda.